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The emigrat ships: St. Olaf - Lammershagen, Newspapers
Hamburg - New Zealand in 1875


St. Olaf

I/S Den Norsk - Amerikanske Dampskipselskap Bergen eide St. Olaf.
Emigrantfartyget St. Olaf:
�r 1869 kungjordes i Bergensposten, att ett stort �ngfartyg,som skulle s�ttas in i fart mellan Bergen New York hade best�llts. F�ljande �r bildades Det Norsk-Amerikanske Dampskipsselskap med Jebsen & Co, Bergen som disponenter. Nybygget St. Olof var p� 2.500 dtw, och kunde ta 30 hytt- och 500 melland�ckspassagerare. Fartyget gjorde sin jungfruresa sommaren 1871 med 252 passagerare. Lasten fr�n Bergen utgjorde endast 20 tunnor saltad makrill och ett fat tran. Resan till New York tog 16 dygn. Det Norsk Amerikanske lade ned sin verksamhet 1875 och d�refter �gdes fartyget av olika norska redare till det skrotades 1903. Siste �garen var H.M. Wrangell i Haugesund.
From: Goeran Aaberg, Sweeden


Lammershagen

Lammershagen arrived at Moreton Bay [the then name for the Port of Brisbane] on 8 January 1873 on the Lammershagen under the command of Captain PAULS. It had left Hamburg on 6 October 1872. The 877 ton vessel carried 399 passengers. During the voyage 17 babies were born and 13 passengers died. On arrival the passengers were placed in quarantine which indicates there was disease on board. A check of records filed in the archives indicates there exists a series of letters of complaints about conditions on board during the voyage.

We have also noted that a file existed regarding complaints made by passengers on the Lammershagen, we discovered that the contents of the file was government correspondence between its agent in London and Brisbane reporting on the complaints made and the investigations of a particular company. The original complaints may have been verbal for they were certainly not in the file and were only mentioned in passing.

We have also noticed that the ship was a subject of material in the Brisbane newspapers of the day. A check of these entries revealed that the vessel was placed in quarantine on arrival due to Typhus Fever contracted from bad water taken on board. The passengers were off loaded onto Peel Island where they were forced to live in tents while a temporary wooden hospital was built. The newspaper report also names all the deaths en route and the causes which are quite interesting.

From Barry Alexander 6/2-96 Australia
I think the ship you quoted in it should be Lammershagen. I did a lot of research on it. It made several journeys to Qld with Danish immigrants. I have a photo of a painting of it sinking off the coast of Wales and a painter did a painting of it!

Dorthea Pedersdatter


My GGrandmothers sister emmigrateted on this voyage to Australia in 1872.

Lammershagen, 3 mast iron hull, saling ship, Sloman & Co. Hamburg<\a>

Hamburg direct (non-stop) to Moreton Bay (Brisbane) Queensland<\a>
dep. 6. October 1872

arr. 8. January 1873

arr. 8. January 1873

Fra den tyske afsejlngsliste fremg�r f�lgende:

155 Jensdatter Bertha F 39 Ullensaker Norge dienstmadchen free passage
283 Pedersdatter Dorthea F 29 Ullensaker Norge dienstmadchen free passage
101 Eriksen Syver M 40 Ullensaker Norge arbeiter free passage

Free passage bet�d at man kun betalte rejsen til Hamburg plus et mindre bel�b for nogle forn�denheder under overfarten, rejse og proviant var betalt af Queerdslands regering, og man havde desuden ret til inkvartering og fuld forplejning i et emigranthus efter ankomsten og helt frem til man havde faet arbejde. Forholdende under overfarten med disse tyske skibe var fra ikke s�rlig gode til meget d�rlige og i enkelte situasjoner katastrofale, men man blev i reglen meget godt modtaget efter ankomsten hvor man ogsa fik virkelig god og proteinrig kost (langt bedre end man var vand til hjemme) og emigranthjemmet var i reglen rimelige for datidens forhold.

LAMMERSHAGEN
Captain H.J. Pauls Surgeon Dr. Theodore Schmidt
departed Hamburg 6. Oct. 1872
arrival Brisbane 8. Jan. 1873
On ship 13 weeks and I day or 3 month & 2 days (93 days).
380 passengers at depature: 206 males, 174 females, 304 adults, 67 children less than ten years of age, 9 less than one year of age.
Nationalities: 133 Danes (incl 11 from Slesvig), 12 Swedes, 67 Norwegians & 149 Germans (incl. 3 from Sleswig & 6 from Holstein) 12 Swiss, 2 Poles.
Number of married couples among the Scandinavians. Danes: 16. Norwegians: 7. Swedes: 2.
Number of passengers at arrival: 384. Number died on voyage: 5 adults 8 children. Number born on voyage: 17. Passengers accounted as adult according to immigrations Act: 328. In Quarantine at arrival!

"LAMMERSHAGEN" according to Lloyd's register and the owner, Robert M. Sloman & Co. Hamburg Reg. No. 565. 3 Mast Iron ship, Sailing Vessel (Vollshff). Ton; 877 NRT' (913,765) (395 C.L.) full weight 1200 tons. 'Netto Register Ton. One NIR has a volume of 2.83 cubic metres.

Dimensions; 182*4/32* 1/19*5 eng.ft. 55.72*9.70*5.68 m. (F.-, I deck 2trB) Masters; P.E. Jorgensen, H.J. Pauls, S. Burow. Built; Alexander Stephen & Sons, Kelvianhaugh, Glasgow 1869 (first voyage for S. & Co 18/8 1868). Port belonging to: Hamburg (IBIhHd). Usual Port of survey and destined voyage: Clyde, Glasgow, & C., USA, Ausuland/New Zealand (wrecked West f Swansea, 18/11 1882)

The death In connection to this voyage 9 people; 5 Danes, I Norwegian and 3 Germans Carl Anton Neilsen aged 20 month (Overgaard, DK), died October 30, from penmguitis; August Wilhelm Wruck, 3 h years (Gr.WangeLPr.Sachsen D), died November I 1, from consiumption; Maria Christina Petersen 6 months (Sonderborg, DK), died of hydrocephalus, 26th November; Johann Emile Hermann Wruck, 7 years (Gr.WugeLPr. Sachsen, D), fell overboard November 26; Maria Helena Frederick, 9 months (Sch�nau Sachsen Tochter), December 7, of peninguitis; Johan Hansen Petersen, 18 month old (S�nderborg, DK), died on December 7, of peninguitis; Maria Magdalene Jacobsen, 18 years (Fredeicia, DK), died December 29, of typhus fever; died In quarantine Soren Christiansen Sorensen 18 years (Nyk�bing, DK), died January I 1, typhus fever, Johann Johannsen, 21 year (Drammen, N) died from consumption on January 20. people that we have further Information on; Ole Hansen Andersen, Idm., K�stiup, v. Brenderup N. Fyn

"LAMMERSHAGEN" according to Lloyd's register and the owner, Robert M. Sloman & Co. Hamburg Reg. No. 565. 3 Mast Iron ship, Sailing Vessel (Vollshff). Ton; 877 NRT' (913,765) (395 C.L.) full weight 1200 tons. 'Netto Register Ton. One NIR has a volume of 2.83 cubic metres.

Dimensions; 182*4/32* 1/19*5 eng.ft. 55.72*9.70*5.68 m. (F.-, I deck 2trB) Masters; P.E. Jorgensen, H.J. Pauls, S. Burow. Built; Alexander Stephen & Sons, Kelvianhaugh, Glasgow 1869 (first voyage for S. & Co 18/8 1868). Port belonging to: Hamburg (IBIhHd). Usual Port of survey and destined voyage: Clyde, Glasgow, & C., USA, Ausuland/New Zealand (wrecked West f Swansea, 18/11 1882)

The death In connection to this voyage 9 people; 5 Danes, I Norwegian and 3 Germans Carl Anton Neilsen aged 20 month (Overgaard, DK), died October 30, from penmguitis; August Wilhelm Wruck, 3 h years (Gr.WangeLPr.Sachsen D), died November I 1, from consiumption; Maria Christina Petersen 6 months (Sonderborg, DK), died of hydrocephalus, 26th November; Johann Emile Hermann Wruck, 7 years (Gr.WugeLPr. Sachsen, D), fell overboard November 26; Maria Helena Frederick, 9 months (Sch�nau Sachsen Tochter), December 7, of peninguitis; Johan Hansen Petersen, 18 month old (S�nderborg, DK), died on December 7, of peninguitis; Maria Magdalene Jacobsen, 18 years (Fredeicia, DK), died December 29, of typhus fever; died In quarantine Soren Christiansen Sorensen 18 years (Nyk�bing, DK), died January I 1, typhus fever, Johann Johannsen, 21 year (Drammen, N) died from consumption on January 20. people that we have further Information on; Ole Hansen Andersen, Idm., K�stiup, v. Brenderup N. Fyn

THE BRISBANE COURIER

Tuesday, January 9,1873

January 8, - Lammershagen ship, 877 tons, Captain H.T. Pauts from Hamburg with 380 ts, including children. SurgeonSuperintendant Theodore Schmidt, Agent, Berens, Ranniger & Co.

The German emigrant ship Lammershagen, with 3371/2. adults, arrived from Hamburg yesterday, after a passage of 94 days. Her passengers will probably be brought up to Brisbane during the course of the day.

Newspaper Unknown: From JOL Cutting Folder on Lammershagen

The Lammershagen

The German immigrant ship Lamhershagen (sic) arrived at Moreton Bay on January 7, 1873 from Hambug with 380 soles, equal to 337and half satute adults. They are classed as follows: - Full payers 38, free 329,remittance 9, assisted 4,. Of these 56 are married couples;there are 116 single women and 76 single women, 12 males and 31 female children under twelve years of age and 5 male and four female infants.

The vessel is under the command of Captain F.F. Pauls and Mr Theodore Schmidt is the Surgeon-Superintendant.

Nearly the whole of the arrivals may be classed as labourers!

(BY ELECTRICAL TELEGRAPIH)

Cape Moreton.- Arrivals:Januaxy 7, Lammershagen ship, from Hamburg.

THE MORETON BAY COURIER

Saturday, January 13,1873

The arrival of the Lammershagen with German immigramts. Her unhealthy condition, and the necessity which has arisen for placing her passengers in quarantine, are circumstances which we cannot afford to pass by without endeavoring to ascertain the causes of the evil, and the remedies which it may be considered expedient to apply in order to diminish the probability of their repetition. We cannot presume to suppose that there will be any laxity of sea on the part of the officials cormected with the Immigration. Department in ascrtaining the real cause of this serious disaster. Typhoid fever, developed as it has been in this ship is not what is sometimes called, "a visitation of God". There is no room for any such impious imputation. If it is a visitation at all it is a visitation from some festering impurities generated by defective ventilation or over-crowded and unclean quarters. It is an effect which we have no doubt can be clearly traced to an efficient cause, and there will be no excuse if those to whom that cause can be traced are not held responsible for its existence. The legal pains and penalties which it may be possible to inflict are slight in comparison with the injury inflected; but the blame should be impartially adjudged, and those who deserve it should be made, as far as possible, to feel their culpability. In the meantime, it is very disheartening, sadly demoralizing to the poor emigrants themselves, that some tree hundred passengers should be landed on an island in the Bay, housed in the most insufficient manner, though doubtless in the best manner which could be devised under the circumstances, and that they should still, though now declared to be in a perfectly healthy condition, be compelled to submit to a prolonged period of isolation. The quarantine regulations do not admit we believe, of futher relaxation, and the passengers of the Lammershagen must still look forward to another dreary month on Peel Island. This "apprenticeship" we can imagine will prove no very fitting or edifying commencement for a career of colonial useftilness. In the event however, of another necessity unfortunately arising for putting in force our Quarantine laws, it seems to be incumbent on us to provide the necessary accommodation which may be required, and which 'in all civilized communities is afforded. And all this can very easily be done by devoting the buildings at Dunwich to the purpose for which they were originally designed and for which they are admirably suited. Nor do we think that the ininates of the quarters which have been diverted to the uses of a Benevolent Asylum would suffer by thus be rendered necessary. Admirably suited as they are in some respect, salubrious as is the climate, isolated as the patients are from all temptation and from the means of obtaining drink they are yet needlessly cut off from the world, deprived often of necessary medical attendance, and ahnost entirely destitute of those spiritual ministrations which are especially consolatory to the mfinn, and to those who have been deprived of all familiar intercourse with friends or relatives. The Military Barracks, which are now unoccupied, have been spoken of not iunsuitable for this purpose. The accommodation they would provide would be amply sufficient; and it would certainly be possible to try how far they might be made applicable as a temporary experiment. It would probably be found necessary to limit the occupants to much more narrow bounds, and to apply much more effective restraints than any which were put in practice when the Benevolent patients occupied the present Police-Barracks, but this is simply a matter of discipline which would only require a little intelligent attention, and we think therefore, that no time should be lost in placing the Quarantine Station at Dunwich in such a condition that it may, if necessary, be made available for the purposes originally designed. Whether the Military Barracks themselves would be suitable as a permanent Benevolent Asylum may well be a matter for further consideration. There could be little difficiaty in applying them temporarily to that purpose.

The Rockhampton BULLETIN

Wednesday, January 15, 1873

The Lammershagen The German immigrant ship Lammershagen arrived at Moreton Bay on January 7, 1873, from Hamburg, with 380 souls, equal to 3371/2 statute adults. They are classes as follows; - Full payers 38, free 329, remittance 9, assisted 4. Of these 56 are manied couples-, there are 116 single man and 76 single women, 12 males and 31 female children under twelve years of age, and 5 male and 4 female adults. The vessel is under the command of Captain H.F.Pauls and Mr. Theodor Schmidt is the Surgeon- Superintendent. Nearly the whole of the new arrivals may be classed as labourers, there being but a few mechanics among them. They came at a very opportune moment, and will no doubt reddy meet with engagements.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

Wednesday, January 22,1873

The Francis Cadell was despatched yesterday morning with provisions and other necessaries for the quarantmed ants at Peel Island, and returned last evening. Dr. Hobbs, the Health Officer, accompanied the steamer, and has courteously placed at our disposal some particulars regarding the state of the immigrants. They are all landed on Peel Island, and are protected from the weather by tents. There are only five patients in the hospital two of whom are suffering from typhoid fever, and two from typhus fever. There is one patient suffering from the effects of the sun while bathing. A man named Johann Johannsen died from consumption on Monday last. The sick are plentifully supplied with fresh bread, mik and other comforts, from Dunwick and the Cadell brought down, yesterday, for the use of the healthy immigrants, a ton of flour and several sheep; and as there is plenty of water on the island, the passengers will be as comfortably placed as is possible under the circumstances. The majority of the immigrants are Scandinavians, haling from Norway and Sweden (ed: not correct, the majority were Danes and Norwegians, there were hardly any Swedes on board), and it was amongst them that the sickness first made its appearance on board. The vessel sailed from Hamburgh on October 6, and there were no symtoms of illness until November 4, when a passenger was attacked with typhus, and continued ill for forty-five days, ultimately recovering. This case was followed by eight cases of typhoid fever, most of which continiued for three weeks. On December 15 typhus again made its appearance, in the person of another Dane, and terminated fatally on December 29. The next case of typhus appered on January 2, and also temiinated fatally, after a caurse of nine days. Two other cases of typhoid fever appeared almost simultaneously with these last two cases of typhus, the sufferers being a Dane and a Norwegian. Another case of typhus occurred on January 19, and the patient is now in progress of convalescence. A case of typhoid fever occurred also on January 14, and terminated fatally on Monday last. The Surgeon-Superintendent of the ship is Dr. Theodore Schmidt, who was here last year in charge of ts per the Herschel. This gentleman attributes the outbreak of disease principally to the bad quality of the water on board, and states that he requested the German Emigration Agent, W.Kirchner, to supply a condencing apparatus, but there was no time to erect it before the vessel left the port. The Scandinavians, it is also stated came on board very scantily clothed, and the blankets supplied by the contractor at Hamburgh for there use were miserable rags. The races of Northern Europe are not noted for cleanliness of living, and it was no doubt impossible to compel such a number of half-clad people as these appeared to be, to preserve those habits of personel cleanliness which are strictly necessary to the carrying out of proper sanitary regulations on board a crowded immigrant ship.

The Lammershagen is represented as a fine vessel containing all necessary accomodation for the conveyance of passengers; and judging by her size and dimensions, there does not seem much to find fault with in her case. She is 845 tons register, British measurement, has a breadth of beam of 31 feet, and is 175 feet long. In the steerage there is a clear width of 17 feet between the row of bunks, and the between decks has a clear height of 7 feet 3 inches. This, we think equals the steerage passenger accomodation of the majority of immigrant vessels of this size trading to Queensland. Now that the immigrants are supplied with plenty of fresh provisions, and are required to keep themselves clean the disease seems to have been checked, and there is no doubt that in the course of a few weeks they may be with safety brought up to the city.

THE MORETON BAY COURIER

Friday, January 24, 1873

SHIPPING MATTERS

The German ship Lammershagen is anchored near Peel Island in quarantine, there being typhus fever amongst her passengers,who are all landed on Peel Island, and are protected from the weather by tents.

There are at present only five patients in the hospital,two of whom are suffering from typhoid fever and two from typhus fever. There is one patient suffering from the effects of the son while bathing.

A man named Johann Johannsen died from consumption on Monday last.The sick are plentifully supplied with fresh bread, milk and other comforts, from Dunwich and Brisbane; and as there is plenty of water on the island, the passengers will be as comfortably placed as is possible under the circumstances.

The majority of the immigrants are Scandinavians, hailing from Norway and Sweden, and it was amongst them that the sickness first made its apearance on board.

The vessel sailed from Hamburgh on October 6 (1872) and there were no symptoms of illness until November 4, when a passenger was attacked with typhus, and continued ill for forty days, ultimately recovering.

This case was followed by eight cases of typhoid fever, most of which continued for three weeks.On December 15, typhus again made its appearance in the person of another Dane, and termaninated fatally on December 29.

The next case of typhus appeared on January 2 and also terminated fatally after a course of 9 days.Two cases of typhoid fever appeared almost simultaneously with these two last cases of typhus, the sufferers being a Dane and a Norwegian.

Another case of typhus occured on January 19, and the parient is now in progress of convalescence. A case of typhoid fever occured also on January 14 and terminated fatally on Monday last.

The Surgeon-Superintendant of the ship is Dr. Theodore Schmidt, who was here last year in charge of immigrants per the Herschel.This gentleman attributes the outbreak of the disease principally to the bad quality of the water on board and states that he requested the German Immigration Agent Mr. Kirchner, to supply a condensing apparatus,but there was no time to erect it before the vessel left the port.

The Scandinavians, it is also stated, came on board very scantily clothed, and the blankets supplied by the contractorat Hamburgh for their use were miserable rags.

The races of Northern Europe are not noted for their cleanliness of living, and it was no doubt impossible to compel such a number of half clad people as these appeared to be, to preserve those habits of personal cleaniness which are strictly necessary to the carrying out of proper sanitary regulations on board a crowded immigrant ship.

The Lammershagen is represented as a fine vessel, containing all the necessary accomodation for the conveyance of passengers; and judging by her size and dimensions, there does not seem much to find fault with in her case.

She is 845 tons register, British measurement,has a breadth of beam of 31 feet and is 174 feet long. In the steerage there is a clear width of 17 feet between the row of bunks, and the between deckshas a clear height of 7 feet 3 inches. This,we think, equals the steerage passenger accomodation of the majority of immigrant vessels of this size trading to Queensland.

Now that the immigrants are supplied with plenty of fresh provisions, and are required to keep themselves clean, the disease seems to have been checked and ther is no doubt that in the course of a few weeks, they may be, with safety, brought up to the city.

The following list of deaths on board has been furnished to the Immigration Agent:

Carl Anton Neilson Aged 20 months Died 30/10/1872 Peninguitis
August Wilhelm Wruck Aged 3&half mths Died 11/11/1872 Consumption
Maria Christina Petersen Aged 6 months Died 26/11/1872 Hydrocephallis
Johann Emile Herman Wruck Aged 7&half yrs Died 26/11/1872 Fell overboard!
Maria Helena Frederich Aged 9 mths Died 9/12/1872 Hydrocephallis
Johan Hansen Petersen Age 18 mths Died 7/12/1872 Peningutitis
Maria Magdalina Jacobsen Age 18 years Died 29/12/1872 Typhus Fever
Sorrn Christiansen Sorensen Age 18 years Died 11/1/1873 Typhus Rever
Johan Johannsen Age 27 years Died Typhoid

The two latter deaths were the only ones which occured since the vessel went into quarantine.

Erata: Whilst on Peel Island in Quarantine and after this list of deaths was compiled, it is known that at least another death occured on the Island that of an unnamed child Born 16/2/1873 Died 16/2/1873 the child of Thomas Gadischke & Marie Nee Osterowski.The child was buried on Peel Island.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

Thursday, February 6,1873

The ship Lammershagen, and the immigrants who arrived in her, were visited at the quarantine station on Tuesday, by the HealthOfficer, who, after careful examination granted a certiftcate for the release of the slfip and crew, which will however, have to be confirmed by the Govemor-in-Council before it can be acted upon. With regard to the immigrants although no new cases of fever have occurred, it is uncertain when they will be released. We hear that the condition of the immigrants at Peel Island is far from comfortable, and, in fact, such as ought not to be permitted. Those who are sick are located in a roughly built wooden structure, but the rest have to reside in tents, and apart from the inconveirdence caused by the recent wet weather, the manner in which these people are huddled together is not calculated to promote either good health or morality.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

12 February 1873 ( After release from Quarantine)

Vessels in Harbour:

Ship Lammershagen 877 ton Capt Paul from Hamburgh

Berens Ranniger & Co Agents.

Imports being cleared and released. (No list of Imports recorded!)

THE BRISBANE COURIER

Thursday, February 13,1873

Entered inwards. February 13. - Lammershagen, 845 tons, Captain H.J.Pauts, from Hamburg. Berens, Ranninger, and Co., agents.

Imports Lammershagen, from Hamburg-. 190 tons of coal Order; 1 trunk, 3 cases, I pouch, 30 cases of wine, 2 pianos, Berens, Ranninger, and Co., agents. 7he German immigrant slup Lammershagen was released from quarantuie on Tuesday.

Ed: same day in an article comparing immigration to the United States of America and to Queensland;

The arrival of Lammershagen with German immigrants, her unhealthy condition, and the necessity which has arisen for placing her passengers in quarantine, are circumstances which we cannot afford to pass by without endeavouring to ascertain the causes of the evil and the remedies which it may be considered expedient to apply in order to h the probability of their repetition. We carmot presume to suppose that there will be any laxity of zeal on the part of the officials connected with the immigration Department in asc the real cause of this serious disaster. Typhid fever, developed as has been in that ship is not what is sometimes called, "a visitation of God." There is no room for any such impurities generated by defective ventilation, or overcrowded and unclean quaters. It is an effect which we have no doubt can be clearly traced to an efficient cause, and there will be no excuse if those to whom that cause can be traced are held responsible for its existence The legal pains and penalties which it may be possible to inflict are slight in comparison with the injury inflicted; but the blame should be impartially adjudged, and those who deserve it should be made, as far as possible, to feel their culpability. In the meantime, it is very disheartening, sadly demoralising to the poor emigrants themselves, that some three hundred passengers should be landed on an island in the Bay, housed in the most insufficient manner, though doubtless in the best manner which could be devised under the circumstances, and that they should still though now declared to be in a perfectly healthy condition, be compelled to submit to a prolonged period of isolation. The quarantine regulation do not admit, we believe, of further relaxation, and the passengers of the Lammershagen must still look forward to another dreary month on Peel Island. This apprenticeship we can imagine will prove no very fitting or edifying commencement for a career of colonial usefulness. In the event however, of another necessity unfortunately that for putting in force our Quarentine laws, it seems to be inculbent on us to provide the necessary accomodation which may be required, and which in all civilised communities is afforded. And this can very easily be done by devoting the buildings at Dunwich to the purpose for which they were originally designed and for which they are admirable sinted. Nor do we think that the inmates of the quaters wluch have been diverted to the use of a Benovolent Asylum would suffer by the change wtuch would thus be rendered necessary. Admirably suited as they are in some respects, salubrious as is the climate, isolated as the patients are from all temptation and from the means of obtaining that they are yet needlessly cut off from the wold, deprived often of necessary medical attendance, and almost entirely destitute of those spiritual ministrations which are especially consolatory to the infirm, and to those who have been deprived of all intercourse with friends or relatives. The Military Barracks, which are now unoccupied, have been spoken of as not insuitable for this purpose. The accomodation they would provide would be amply sufficient; and it would certainly be possible to try how far they might be made applicable as a temporary experiment. It would probably be found necessary ti limit the occupants to much more narrow bounds, and to apply much more effective restraints than any which are put m practice when the Benevolent patients occupied the present Police Barracks; but this is simply a matter of diciphne which would only require a little intelligent attention, and we think, therefore, that no time should be lost in placing the Quarantine Station at Dunwich in such a condition that it may, if necessary, be made available for the purpose originally designed. Whether the Military Barracks themselves would be suitable as a permanent Benovolent Asylum may well be a matter for further consideration. There could be little difficulty in applying them temporarily to that purpose.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

20 February 1873

Shipping - Departures

Telegram:

Cape Moreton February 19 Departure Lammershagen Ship for Rangoon at noon.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

Friday, February 21,1873

Shipping Matters

The German immigrant ship Lammershagen was released from quarantne on the 11th instant has since left for Rangoon with a portion of her original cargo, consisting of coal.

THE MORETON COURIER

Wednesday, February 26,1973

The immigrants per Lammershagen have been relesed from quarantine, all traces of contagious disease having disappeared from amongst them.The steamer Kate left yesterday morning for Peel Island with the Immigration Agent, Mr. Gray, on board, and it was intended to embark the immigrants during yesterday, and bring them up to town to-day. Their arrival may therefore be looked for this evening.

THE MORETON COURIER

Thursday, February 27,1873

The Lammershagen immigrants were brought up to town yesterday from the quarantine ground at Peel Island by the steamer Kate, which arrived at the Queens wharf about half-past 1 p.m. There were admitted into the dep6t 102 single men 49 single women, and about 50 married couples, with their familis, making a total of 326 persons. It was deemed advisable to leave in quarantine for some days longer a few of the passengers who had been employed in attending to the fever-stricken immigrants. The immigants generally look well and we have no doubt when once settled down m their new homes will prove useful colorists. They comprise representatives of most of the races of Northern Europe, but the Danish and Swedish (ed: should have been Norwegian) element largely out-numbered all the others.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

8 May 1873 Article on first Official Enquiry.

An official enquiry was held on Tuesday last by the Immigration Board into certain charges preferred against Dr. Schmidt, the late Surgeon-Superintendent of the German Ship Lammershagen. The members of the Board present were - Messrs. F.O. Darvell (in the Chair) J. Mc Donnell, and Dr Hobbs. Mr Gray, the Immigration Agent was also in attendance, but did not take part in the proceedings. The enquiry was granted at the instance of Mr.C.G. Campen, who alleged that Dr. Schmidt had been guilty of cruelty to two of the immigrants, named Johann Frederick and Emily Rhoda. ( note that the reconstructed passenger list does not mention these names in the list!) It was also alleged that improper relations had existed between the doctor and the matron. The evidence brought foward proved, in the opinion of the Board, all charges to be totally destitute of foundation. The evidence showed that the two persons mentioned had, until the ship was put in quarantine, lived together as man and wife.

The doctor about this time was informed by persons coming from the same place, that these parties were not married, and when the passenges were landed on Peel Island, he thought it was his duty to separate them. This and the fact that the woman had been punished for misconduct by being made to sit under a tree for two hours, were the alleged acts of cruelty! The man stated that he had been married to the woman since his arrival in Brisbane, whereas the woman asserted that they had been married for the last three years. On the other hand, a mass of testimony was given to show that the doctor had performed his duties in a most efficient and praisworthy manner, evincing the greatest care for the well-being of the immigrants while under his care. The charge relative to the Matron were also refuted in the clearest possible way.We understand that the report of the board will not only exonerate Dr. Schmidt from all balme, but express the belief that his arduous duties were carried out with great skill and kindness. THe German Consul, who at the suggestion of the Chairman, was present during the proceedings,expressed himself as quite satisfied with the result and stated that he himself would prepare a report for the German authorities representing Dr. Schmidt's conduct in the proper light.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

9 May 1873 Page 4

Article about the other German Fever Ship the Alardus which the Colonial Secretary tried to stop for sailing from Hamburg.

It also suffered from Typhus with quite a few deaths. The Captain commited suicide by jumping overboard and the crew stopped in at Melbourne and the ship was quarantined ther for a month before proceeding to Brisbane. This article is relevant to the Lammershagen but is not listed here for space reasons.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

12 May 1873 page 6

The Lammershagen Enquiry

To the Editor of the Brisbane Courier. ( Letter dated 9th May 1873)

Sir, - From a note which appears in your yesterday's edition, I see that the Immigration Board, holding on Tuesday last, an enquiry with respect to certain charges against Dr. Schmidt, the Surgeon Superintendent of the Lammershagen, came on the evidence brought forward to the conclusion, that all the charges were destitute of foundation.

At the request of Mr. Gray, the Immigration Agent, I have attended to this enquiry, and although I have had to leave in consequence of pressure of private business previous to the termination of the enquiry, I consider myself entitled of course with all due respect to the Board, to state that according to the evidence tendered up to the time I left, Dr Schmidt has not conducted himself properly, and has, amongst other things, committed an act of great cruelty in placing a woman passenger on suspicion of having written an anonymous letter exposing his conduct, under a tree,which he himself called "ein galgen" ( a Gallows); she being for three hours, (from midday) exposed to the hot sun,without any cover- an outrage from which she is still suffering.

A disinterested party, who says that he himself had no complaints to make against Dr Schmidt, having treated always civilly and politely, testified to this outrage, adding that the doctor threatened to shoot everyone who dared to speak to her of to come near her.

If my statement should be questioned, let the evidence, taken down by Mr Jones, the short hand writer, at the enquiry, be published, in order to give the public an opportunity to form their own judgement.

My report to the Lord Chancellor of Germany, to be sent by next mail will be drwan accordingly, and in accordance with the truth.

As to the statement that the enquiry was instigated at my instance, all I can say is that it is not true;and everyone knowing me will not dispute my assertion that I would not bring such charges as I did against Dr. Schmidt without giving him a chance to answer them.

In proof of this, I beg to refer to the correspondence annexed,from which you can see that I insisted upon an enquiry about a fortnight previous to the doctor leaving the colony,and that somebody at the Immigration Office is responsible for allowing Dr. Schmidt to leave the Colony without being called to account.

All I afterwards asked from the Colonial Secretary was, as you may see from my letter of the 28th April, that an enquiry might be instituted in order to ascertain whose faultit is thatDr.Schmidt was allowed to leave the Colony without being called to account. I am waiting for an answer yet.

Considering that the public naturally takes a great interest in this case, we all of us being very anxious to get at the truth, I hope you will, from these reasons, and in justice to my countrymen and myself, as well as to all parties concerned, publish, along with this letter, the correspondence referred to above. - Yours etc

CHARLES G. CAMPEN

Brisbane, May 9.

[ The correspondence is too voluminous to publish after the enquiry has been held. - Ed. B.C.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

14 May 1873 Page 3

We are authorised to state that a telegram from the Colonial Secretary complaining of the condition in which the immigrants by the Lammershagen arrived and also of the fearfull state of the immigrants by the Alardus now at Melbourne, has been forwarded to the Agent General at London.

It contains a grave censure on those connected with the shipment of emigrants and more particulary as regards the latter vessel. The Agent General in London has been instructed not to allow German Immigrants in future through the same medium.

THE BRISBANE COURIER

14 May 1873 Page 3

Story of the voyage of the Ship Alardus from Hamburg to Brisbane. Due to a typus outbreak, quite a few died. The Captain committed suicide by jumping overboard in the Great Australian Bight. The First mate was sick so the crew sailed the ship to Melbourne and it was placed in quarantine for a month!

The article is too long to repeat here but is relevant to Lammershagen.

Fra Robert �rsted Jensen, historiker fra Kobenhavn som for tiden opholder seg
i Queensland hvor han skriver p� en bok om Skandinaverne i Australien.
Har jeg v�rt s� heldig � f� disse opplysninger.

"St.Olaf' sejlede kun til Hamburg. Og det var bestemt ikke nogen let tur fra Hamburg, den var non-stop og varede 1 � m�ned lengere end du troede. De blev dog vel behandlet efter ankomsten. "Billedet" som avisene giver af denne rejse er dog ikke helt korrekt, denne tur med Lammershagen var ikke den verste, vi har et par tyske skibe som ankom med fra 30 til 50 omkomne og et var 1 � �r undervejs. Men i 1872-73 var der opposition mod ikke-britisk indvandring og den megen st�hej om netop dette skib er politisk betinget, st�rke krefter ville stoppe indvandringen fra Tyskland og Skandinavien. Det lykkedes imidlertid ikke og der ankom ca. 5.500 skandinavere til Queensland i perioden 1870-80. Blikfeldt & Co var den ene af de norske agenter. Jeg har alene til Queensland i en 7-�irig periode mellem 1870-1879 registreret 739 norske udvandrere, men der ankom snarere omkring 1.000 efler flere i dette ti-�r, mange nordmend var sj�folk som hoppede af fra deres skibe hvorfor de ikke var registreret.

Dorthea Pedersdatter giftede sig i Brisbane, Queensland 21. October 1876 med den svenske sj�mand fra Falkenberg, Hallands Len: Julius Bemhard Olsson (son af Olaf Olsson & Cathrine Andersson). Parret flyttet efter nogen tid i denne by,flyttede op til Bundaberg distriktet omkring 1880. Dette omr�de var endnu meget ungt med rige muligheder for at blive pionerer p� egen jord. Af dokutnenter kan vi se at parret bliver leaseholders ved Yandaran Creek i Oktober 1883 og at der udstedes certifikat p� 300 acres her i april 1886. Yandaran er ca 28 km nord-vest for Bundaberg. Familien er stadig bosiddende i Bundaberg distriktet in 1896 hvor Julius undersskriver et dokument til st�tte for hans danske venner vedr�rende en strid om Consul i Brisbane. P� dette tidspunkt skriver Julius sin adresse som "Famer in Woongarra", hvilket er kun f� km �st for Bundaberg (m�ske er han flyttet men det kan ogs� v�re en fejl). I august 1917 er de, som jeg tror, at Barry allerede har nevnt bosiddende p� Lot 6 i Bundaberg distriktet hvad er i samme omr�de. Hvor lot 6 er ved jeg ikke. Julius Bemhard Olsson havde tilsyneladende en sl�ktning i Bundaberg ved navn Johan Alfred Olsson (26/9 1843 Falkenberg, son af Olaf Bemhard Olsson & Catharina Magnus).

GAUSTAD Christopher, Ipswich Walloon Norway, 38 years old (*c: 1839) Lutheran Minister, 22. March 1877. Presten blev naturaliseret i 1877 (dvs. Fik britisk statsborgerskab i Queensland). Han var da bosiddende i Wallon ved byen Ipswich et � hundrede km. vest for Brisbane.

Vissit this page about the history of Pastor Gaustad
http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~dbarry/family/christop.htm

 

The emigrat ships: St. Olaf - Lammershagen, Newspapers
Hamburg - New Zealand in 1875


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